How to find a 1948 to 1953 Dodge Truck Frame Number
 

The images below show some of the more common locations for the Serial Number on the frame of 1948 to 1953 Pilot House Dodge Trucks, though the number may be several inches to either side, above, or below the locations shown. Different models, and sizes of trucks in the Pilot House era got the frame number stamped in different locations, so there are images below that show several different examples of frame number locations. Detroit and California built trucks also sometimes got the numbers stamped in different locations on the same model truck, just to make things more interesting.

Dodge may have used a small child with a tack hammer to strike the number die, as the stamps are often shallow, and may be hard to find. Here are a few tips to make finding the number easier.

1. Clean the area down to bare metal, a wire wheel in a drill works well for this.

2. Clean a larger area then shown in the images, the number may be in a slightly different spot.

3. Getting the area wet (water works fine for this, or some light oil) can help make some numbers easier to read.

4. If the area is rusty or the number is hard to make out, take close up digital images of the number, and enlarge them on the computer. This trick often helps make out a hard to read number.

 

1/2 ton to 1 ton 1948-1953 Dodge Trucks built in Detroit. Models B C D.

A 1950 B-2-B-108 pickup built in Detroit, Michigan has its frame number location shown in the two images below. This location should be very close to correct for all Detroit built 1948-53 1/2 ton to 1 ton trucks. Note the number is facing out towards the wheel just above and behind the front spring shackle on the drivers side of the frame. The number has been filled in with white chalk to make it easier to see.


Click for larger image

Click for larger image

1/2 ton to 1 ton 1948-1953 Dodge Trucks built in California. Models B C D.

A 1949 B-1-B-108 pickup built in California has its frame number location shown in the two images below. Note that this number is in a slightly different location then the Detroit built trucks serial number above. This location should be very close to correct for all California built 1948-53 1/2 ton to 1 ton trucks. Note the number is facing out towards the wheel just above the front spring shackle on the drivers side of the frame. The number has been filled in with white chalk to make it easier to see.


Click for larger image

Click for larger image

1 1/2 ton to 2 1/2 ton 1948-1953 Dodge Trucks. Models F G H J K.

A 1953 B-4-J Stake truck built in Detroit, Michigan has its frame number location shown in the two images below. This location should be very close to correct for all 1948-53 1 1/2 ton to 2 1/2 ton trucks.Note the number is facing out towards the wheel just behind the front spring shackle on the drivers side of the frame. The number has been filled in with white chalk to make it easier to see.


Click for larger image

Click for larger image

2 3/4 ton to 4 ton 1948-1953 Dodge Trucks. Models R T V Y.

A 1953 B-3-R-172 Cab Chassis truck built in Detroit, Michigan has its frame number location shown in the two images below. This location should be very close to correct for all 1948-53 2 3/4 ton to 4 ton trucks. Note the number is facing out towards the wheel just above and behind the front spring shackle on the drivers side of the frame. The number has been filled in with white chalk to make it easier to see.


Click for larger image

Click for larger image

COE 1 1/2 ton to 2 1/2 ton 1948-1953 Dodge Trucks. Models FM GM HM JM KM.

A 1948 B-1-FM-131 Cab Over Engine (COE) truck built in Detroit, Michigan has its frame number location shown in the two images below. This location should be very close to correct for all 1948-53 COE trucks. Note the number is facing out towards the wheel just above and in front of the rear spring shackle for the front spring on the drivers side of the frame. Look for the running board/cab step bracket for reference. The number has been filled in with white chalk to make it easier to see.


Click for larger image

Click for larger image
 
Because of the inconsistency of the frame number locations it is important to check more then one area for the number before giving up. The numbers are also often covered over by welded on aftermarket accessories, these may need to be removed to find some numbers.
 
Checking the frame number is a good idea even with trucks that have tags, as it is quite common to see the tags swapped and all kinds of other things being changed. These were work trucks, and were fixed up just enough to get the job done, nobody was worried about anything other than function.
 
I hope to update this page from time to time as more info becomes available, and feedback is given about other information that would be good to include on this page.
 

Please contact the Registry maintainers at the below email address if you have any suggestions or questions.


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